Since the Google Glass launch there has been huge buzz around this brand new piece of wearable technology. Glass has received a lot of coverage from all kinds of technology blogs, including us. In spite of all the information being available online, there are still big questions in the minds of the public: “What can Google Glass actually do?!” or “Why would anybody use them?!”.

In this post we will look at different uses for Google Glass and some awesome value-adding applications.

What Can Google Glass Do At The Moment?

In its current (beta) state Glass has very limited functionality, which boils down to only a few things. It has far more potential than it has functionality. But this doesn’t stop bleeding edge technology enthusiasts from buying them for $1500 (which is a lot).

Google will likely start selling Glass to the public mid-2014 for an unknown price. Just recently we have published the results of our survey, which shows that most people were willing to pay between $200-$300 for Glass.

Google Glass’ basic functions:

  • Take pictures
  • Record videos
  • Show notifications
  • Give directions
  • Google Hangouts (video calling)

In my opinion, Google Glass is an amazing playground for developers, who would be able to create awesome apps around Google’s hardware.

Future Applications of Google Glass

With the first Glass(es) being shipped, an increasing number of developers start creating great apps for Glass, giving it a lot more functionality. Let’s look at what we would be able to do with Glass in the near future:

1. Education

There is an increasing demand for online education. More and more people start enrolling in online courses through different education platforms (such as Udemy) or look at educating YouTube videos. There are a lot of talented people who can show you how to do the things you want to learn.

With Google Glass you could now “attend” cooking classes hosted by world-famous chefs and see exactly what they are seeing. Imagine how many different things  people could teach each other!

Andrew Vanden Heuvel, a physics teacher from Michigan, had a great idea how to use Google Glass for education: he took his class on a virtual field trip into the Large Hadron Collider (see video below).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=yRrdeFh5-io

2. Healthcare

Nowadays some surgeons already wear head-mounted cameras to film everything they see. They also have to have an eye on different stats like heart rate, blood pressure, etc. Using Google Glass it would be possible to combine a camera with a “surgical dashboard” showing all necessary stats in the corner of the eye without any distractions.

3. Collaboration

Google Glass opens up new possibilities for online collaboration. Start a Google Hangout with your colleagues and see what they are seeing – sketches, mind maps, creative work and much more. Check out other collaboration tools we use at trendblog.net!

4. Sports

There is now a way to enhance your sports viewing experience, which will bring the action on the field right to you. Referees wearing Google Glass would be able to stream everything they see on the field, giving you the opportunity to see all the action, which you can’t see from a distance.

A head-mounted referee-cam has already been tested a while ago. The video below shows you exactly how it looks like.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=WiXzm_RfB10#t=24s

5. Games

With Google Glass you and your kids would be able to participate in awesome outdoor games like interactive treasure hunts. It is also a great way to explore new cities in a very fun and interesting way.

6. Journalism

Nowadays, information is everything. News spread on Twitter like wildfire, videos of the most recent events are being uploaded to YouTube and pictures are taken with Instagram.

News companies don’t have their crews everywhere. But with Google Glass everybody could be a journalist – streaming live video of breaking news or live events from anywhere in the world. There are already many services which offer this functionality for smartphones, but there’s a downside to it: the person who is recording the video will have to hold up a smartphone all the time. With Google Glass you would be able to focus on what is happening and let others see it too.

Conclusion

There is still a lot to come. As I have previously mentioned, Google Glass has far more potential than it has functionality. And Google knows it. As soon as more developers will have their hands on Glass, we will see a huge number of new apps being developed for it.

What would you use Google Glass for? Share your thoughts in the comments!