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How To Download Twitter Videos The Easy Way Without Software – 2021

How To Download Twitter Videos The Easy Way Without Software - 2021

Video is the hot medium on the Internet. Everyone is getting in on it, even me. Thanks to cameras being on all smartphones now, even your mother are getting in on the action. Businesses are posting videos to put a public face on their company and brand. It’s a brave new world.

There are so many types of video to make on the Internet. You can live-stream a video in real time or you can simply upload something you made with a camera phone. Quite a lot of these videos are instantly forgettable though, but what about when you find that one video you MUST keep?

With photos, it is a simple case of right-clicking and saving, but with videos, there’s another couple of steps involved.

Read more: How to download videos from Facebook

Download Twitter Videos Without Needing Software

If you look online, you will find all manner of snake oil salesmen offering expensive software to download Twitter videos. But the reality is, you don’t need software at all, and you needn’t spend a penny either.

One video series I enjoy on Twitter is Burned Your Tweet. This is where someone has made a robot that prints out each Donald Trump tweet, as the President puts them out. Then the robot burns it. Everyone is filmed and uploaded to Twitter.

Yes I know, what can I say? I like mindless entertainment sometimes.

Now what if I wanted to download these videos to my computer for offline viewing? Easy.

Step 1 : Click On The Twitter Timestamp

The first step is to click on the timestamp next to the tweet, showing when it went out.

This then opens the tweet up in its own URL and in its own box.

Step 2 : Go Mobile

Now go to the URL bar and after the https://, type mobile or m. This will open up the mobile version of that page.

Step 3 : Play & Download

At that point, you are still not going to be able to download. You first need to play the video a little bit, maybe just five seconds or so. But even though you’ve only watched 5 seconds, the rest of the video will have loaded in the browser.

NOW right-click on the video and you will see the option “Download Video“.

Click on that, and you will be prompted where you want to download the video. All done!

Two other ways of downloading it are :

That’s it, you’ve successfully downloaded Twitter video!

How to download video from Twitter to an iPhone or iPad?

Now, unlike downloading from a regular browser, using your laptop or a PC, downloading a video to an iOS device is a little bit more complicated. Luckily, not too complex.

  1. Download this app
  2. Go to Twitter and Find a video you want to download and save
  3. You will see four icons under the video; tap on the right one
  4. Tap on “Copy link”
  1. Go to the Documents app you previously downloaded
  2. Tap on “Browser”
  1. Enter this link inside the search bar www.twdown.net
  2. Now paste the URL of the video you want to download
  3. Choose the video quality, give it a name, and press “Done”

That’s it; your video has been downloaded! It wasn’t that hard, right?

How to download Twitter videos on an Android phone or tablet?

Here, a procedure is a bit different than if you are an iOS user. Follow the steps below to download the video.

  1. Install Download Twitter Videos app 
  2. Go to Twitter and open the video you wish to download
  3. Tap on “Share”
  4. Choose “Share via” and select Download Twitter Videos app
  1. Choose the quality

Your video has been successfully saved! Go to your “Downloads” section on your device and enjoy the video!

Two Other Web-Based Downloaders

Two others which did very well, and produced download links within seconds were Twitter Video Downloader, and DreDown.

Conclusion

Despite many companies trying to convince you that you need to pay for everything on the net, you CAN do it for free.

Do you download Twitter videos via another means? If so, let us know in the comments which one you use.

Editors Recommendation

Marom

Marom is a senior writer at WIRED specialising on information security, digital privacy, and hacking. A former technology correspondent for Slate, she was also a staff writer for Future Tense, a publication and project of Slate, the New America Foundation, and ASU. Additionally her work has appeared in Gizmodo, Fast Company, IEEE Spectrum, and Popular Mechanics. She is a New Yorker who calls the city home.
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